My Sump Pump Spraying Water: What to Do?

A sump pump spraying water is not something you want to see. Sump pumps are designed to remove water from your home, so there is a problem when you see one spraying water.

A few things could be causing your sump pump to spray water. For example, it could be that the pump is not properly seated in the pit, the discharge pipe could be blocked, or there could be a problem with the check valve.

Water Spraying Check Valve

The check valve is located between the pump and the discharge pipe. Its job is to make sure that water only flows in one direction – from the pit to the discharge pipe.

If the check valve is not working properly, it could allow water to flow back into the pit, causing the pump to spray water. The most prevalent problem is a seal that is not tight enough or has come off.

Water Spraying Weep Hole

The weep hole is located on the side of the pump. Its job is to allow water to drain out of the pump if it gets too full. If the weep hole is blocked, it could cause the pump to spray water.

You might notice water shooting out the side of your weep hole and back into the pit. This may appear to be an issue, but the advantages of having a weeping hole far outweigh any minor reduction in water efficiency.

Water Spraying Discharge Pipe

The discharge pipe carries water away from the pit and out of your home. If the discharge pipe is blocked, it could cause the pump to spray water.

If there is water spraying from the discharge pipe, the sump pump is trying to remove groundwater. If the leak is external, you'll have to repair the connection between the pipes to avoid a basement flood.

If you see your sump pump spraying water, turn it off immediately. Then, check the weep hole, discharge pipe, and valve to see if there is a problem. If you can't fix the problem yourself, call a plumber.

Sump pump spraying water: Reasons and Solutions

A few things could be causing your sump pump to spray water. For example, it could be that the pump is not properly seated in the pit, the discharge pipe could be blocked, or there could be a problem with the check valve.

Leaky Seal to Discharge Pipe

If there is a leaky seal to your discharge pipe, it could allow water to flow back into the pit, causing the pump to spray water. The most prevalent problem is a seal that is not tight enough or has come off.

To check for a loose or missing seal, inspect the connection between the discharge pipe and the pump. If you see any gaps, attempt to reseal them with the plumber's putty or another waterproof material. If the sealant does not hold, you may need to replace the entire discharge pipe.

Clogged Discharge Pipe

The discharge pipe carries water away from the pit and out of your home. If the discharge pipe is blocked, it could cause the pump to spray water.

If there is water spraying from the discharge pipe, the sump pump is trying to remove groundwater. If the leak is external, you'll have to repair the connection between the pipes to avoid a basement flood.

If you think your discharge pipe is clogged, inspect it for any blockages. If you find a blockage, try to remove it with a plunger or a plumber's snake.

Faulty Check Valve

The check valve is located between the pump and the discharge pipe. Its job is to make sure that water only flows in one direction – from the pit to the discharge pipe.

If the check valve is not working properly, it could allow water to flow back into the pit, causing the pump to spray water. The most prevalent problem is a seal that is not tight enough or has come off.

If you think your check valve is faulty, inspect it for gaps or missing seals. If you find a problem, attempt to reseal the valve with the plumber's putty or another waterproof material. If the sealant does not hold, you may need to replace the entire check valve.

Blocked Weep Hole

The weep hole is located on the side of the pump. Its job is to allow water to drain out of the pump if it gets too full. If the weep hole is blocked, it could cause the pump to spray water.

You might notice water shooting out the side of your weep hole and back into the pit. This may appear to be an issue, but the advantages of having a weeping hole far outweigh any minor reduction in water efficiency.

If you think your weep hole is blocked, try to clear it with a plunger or a plumber's snake. If you can't clear the blockage yourself, call a plumber.

Holes in Piping

If there are holes in the piping, it could allow water to flow back into the pit, causing the pump to spray water. This is most likely to happen if the pipes are old or corroded.

If you think your pipes might have holes, inspect them for gaps or missing seals. If you find a problem, attempt to patch the holes with the plumber's putty or another waterproof material. If the sealant does not hold, you may need to replace the entire pipe.

Electric Issues

If the pump is not getting enough power, it could cause the pump to spray water. This is most likely to happen if the power cord is damaged or the circuit breaker is tripped.

If you think there may be an issue with the power supply, inspect the power cord for any damage. If the cord is damaged, you will need to replace it. Likewise, if the circuit breaker has been tripped, you will need to reset it.

Final Words

If your sump pump is spraying water, it could be a sign of a severe problem. There are several reasons why this might happen, and you'll need to troubleshoot the issue to find the cause. Once you've found the cause, you can take steps to fix it and avoid a basement flood.

We hope you found this article helpful. If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact us.

Sump Pump Advisor
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